How Did I Get Here?

Alejandra_2016_PRINT.jpg

Alejandra, was 27 years old when I meet her in the Cd.Juarez Brothels she charged 130 pesos for encounter approximately (7 US dollars). Alejandra was beautiful she had big green eyes and was adorned with different tattoos and spoke the English language with proficiency. She shared with us that she lived in Tijuana, then in San Diego, but thereafter was deported back to Mexico. She was diagnosed with colon cancer. Like so many of the women working in the Juarez brothels, she does not receive medical care. Though she has already exceeded her two-year life expectancy, Alejandra coped with the physical pain by self-medicating using mainly heroin and crack. She died recently after I took the photograph leaving her four children behind.

HOW DID I GET HERE?

I am a Philadelphia-based artist who was born and raised on the Mexican/American border. I had long wanted to do a body of work which focused on the global issue of human trafficking and women exploited into prostitution. Over three years ago, I was afforded the opportunity to capture a series of photographs centering on the lives of prostitutes. The specific setting is unimportant because it is representative of the ravages that are visited on women by the prostitution industry around the world.

In presenting this series, my goal is to depict and expose the adversity exploited women must overcome in their daily lives and show the other side of prostitution; the side the industry does not want you to see.

I discovered that the majority of the women in the brothels I visited are not from the towns in which they work. Rather, they come from other countries in search of a better life. Many of them arrive with their families but are left behind or abducted. Out of all the brothels I visited, I only met one woman who was originally from the town in which the brothel was located. The majority of the girls have long, complicated histories, ranging from child abuse to single parenthood. However, many of them are open about their past for they believe they have already lost everything, and their only reason to live is drugs. As a result, they no longer feel the pain and humiliation of their current circumstances.

As I continue to revisit same brothels now for over three years I am sometimes welcomed by some of the same women. It saddens me to see how their bodies had deteriorated due to their drug abuse (primarily heroin) and how the youngest girls, who had only begun to prostitute themselves a year ago, had completely transformed -  they are now bitter drug users. It also breaks my heart to learn that several of them were killed and one was missing. 

I want to emphasize that I like these women, and I want others to understand their circumstances and see them as women who deserve to be acknowledged and helped. They have no health care and no access to rehabilitation. If they cannot attract clients, they go without food. I am carrying out this project because I want to document a difficult reality that must be exposed.

In doing this, I hope to raise funds for Las Madres Oblatas the only organization that helps women in prostitution in the region where I photographed.

This series and experience has greatly humbled me and allowed me to be grateful for my own life. It has also given me a sense of responsibility to create awareness and to help. I hope that my exhibit it will have an impact on you as well, and give you awareness to want to make a difference.

 

Due to the delicate nature of this body of work and out of respect for the women who I photographed,  I have chosen to show this series only in the art community and in cultural and educational spaces.

Santa_Muerte_02.jpg

Monica is 40 years old and has five children, all fathered by different men. Her mother takes care of four of the children; Monica sold the fifth child because her mother refused to care for her. She is addicted to heroin and was sent to prison for murder. Strangely, when she arrived at the court for sentencing, the judge was not present. As a result she was able to avoid time in prison. She attributes this fortunate turn of events to “La Santa Muerte,” to whom she pays homage with a tattoo on her back and with daily rituals.

Sylvia_2017.jpg

Sylvia is 36 and has three children. She suffered a back injury but did not receive medical treatment. As a result, she is permanently disabled and relies on crutches. Still without proper treatment for her condition, Sylvia self-medicates using a combination of pills, solvents, marijuana, and crack cocaine. One of her daughters is also a prostitute and the other two live with her.

Dionicia, age 40, left her home in Southern Mexico at the age of 15 in search of opportunities and a better quality of life. She travelled north toward the U.S. border and landed in Juarez. Tragically, her young son was killed when a stray bullet struck him in the neck. To deal with the sorrow of losing her son, Dionicia started using heroin. She soon she became an addict. I met Dionicia when she was coming down from a drug-induced high. When we started the shoot she was telling me jokes and jumping on the bed; ten minutes later she could not stop crying.

Dionicia, age 40, left her home in Southern Mexico at the age of 15 in search of opportunities and a better quality of life. She travelled north toward the U.S. border and landed in Juarez. Tragically, her young son was killed when a stray bullet struck him in the neck. To deal with the sorrow of losing her son, Dionicia started using heroin. She soon she became an addict. I met Dionicia when she was coming down from a drug-induced high. When we started the shoot she was telling me jokes and jumping on the bed; ten minutes later she could not stop crying.


La Bestia


I decided to use my photography to bring attention to the social injustices experienced by Latin American people in crisis. I documented the Migrant Caravan that consisted of people mainly from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador also know as the Northern Triangle. 


As an independent Artist with no firm political agenda, I was interested to learn the truth about the statements being spread about the Migrant Caravan.  Donal Trump, "Sadly, it looks like Mexico’s Police and Military are unable to stop the Caravan heading to the Southern Border of the United States. Criminals and unknown Middle Easterners are mixed in. I have alerted Border Patrol and Military that this is a National Emergy. Must change laws!"

I took a flight to Tapachula, Mexico on the border of Guatemala, where the immigrants were waiting and anticipating their cross into Mexico.  I began Photographing and asking questions.  As soon as they came over the border into Mexico I spoke with as many different members of the Caravan as I could.  Many are young women disguising themselves as men and boys to avoid rape and attacks.  Others are running from being extorted and threatened with death by the Honduran Gangs.  Many with handicaps, such as a man named Juan Alberto, traveling with his young daughter who suffers from cerebral palsy.  Another man travelled all the way from Honduras to Tijuana in a wheelchair in hopes of getting treatment for his spine.

Donald Trump has threatened to send troops to the U.S. border and cut aid to Central America. Despite these threats, the Latin American families in the caravan have continued to push toward the U.S. border. Thankfully, the Mexican people and authorities have shown compassion, giving those traveling with the caravan necessary food, clothing and shelter during the difficult and often dangerous journey. Priest Alejandro Solalinde, director of the Hermanos en el Camino shelter in Ixtepec, Oaxaca, and one of the most prominent figures in the fight for immigrant rights in Mexico, has said that immigrants suffer a cataclysm. When they cross the border in their fight to reach the American Dream because they are "exposed to all types of violence as soon as they leave their countries." I have witnessed this holocaust firsthand in my work documenting immigrants. The people that I have met are not the criminals depicted by Donald Trump--they are parents, students, and children with the same hopes and aspirations as the European immigrants fighting religious and political persecution at the turn of the 19th century. Like those before them, they can make the United States a better place if given a chance. There are over 7,000 immigrants traveling in the caravan, over 2,700 of which are children. Without a sound immigrant policy, however, many immigrants have been caught in a no-win and unjust situation. My mission is to document the plight of these immigrants, expose the truth about who they are and the injustices that they suffer, and make people aware of all that they have to offer the United States. I intend to tell their stories of bravery, strength and perseverance.

Immigration30.jpg
Immigration15_PRINT.jpg
Immigration06_PRINT.jpg
Immigration49.jpg
07_waiting for the train.jpg
08_Jose y Oscar.jpg
09_Marcos.jpg